Monthly Archives: March 2012

Amsterdam Bridge Competition

We had a lot of fun working on this bridge concept:

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Unfortunately, we didn’t win the competition. However, I still think the idea is pretty cool. Here’s some text:

ZwerverBrug, or literally, Wanderer Bridge, is both a means and an end. Inspired by traditional two arch stone bridges, the Zwerver uses primary steel tubes and secondary webbing clad in pre-finished steel panels to support a stone clad deck. The structure and form work together, creating two unique experiences. First, an elevated direct route across the river providing the necessary height to allow the majority of river traffic to pass underneath. Secondly, a stepped and lowered boulevard housing a cafe and affording conversations, seating, lounging, and strolling. In order ensure accessibility, the steps in the deck are flattened when the slope of the underlying surface is safely transversible by wheelchair, stroller, walker, and of course bicycle.

So, Wanderer, which way are you going?

One of the interesting challenges was creating a GH definition for the squashed steps. The idea is that given a a surface contoured by height intervals (a process that has been nicely componentized…), the definition grabs the surface normal at a bunch of points along each contour curve. If the surface normal varies from the z-axis by more than a preset amount, the curve pops up, creating a step.

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Crazy as it looks, this thing might actually work:

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  1. Gap between glass gaurd and stone wearing surface for drainage
  2. Cast-in anchor for glass guard connections
  3. Cross slope to exterior for drainage
  4. Precast concrete deck panels
  5. Stone wearing surface
  6. Setting bed
  7. Continuous stainless steel pipe
  8. Laminated glass guard
  9. Intermittent patch fittings
  10. Primary curved pipe
  11. Pre-finished metal panel cladding
  12. Web openings for distribution of services
  13. Intermittent transverse members rigidly coupling primary pipes
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Filed under Architecture, Competition, Geometry